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The Adventure Issue
Spring 2015

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HMS

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fourth-year student, Adaugo Amobi, celebrating news of her residency appointment
Adaugo Amobi cele­brates the news of her residency match.
 

A bell rang, signaling to members of the class of 2015 that they could tear open the personalized envelopes containing news of where each would spend the next three to seven years of training.

On March 20, the annual Match Day ceremony, during which medical students learn where they will serve their residencies, was held at medical schools across the country.

Students who were candidates for matching, along with family and friends, assembled in the Tosteson Medical Education Center atrium to celebrate matches with hugs and high fives, selfies, and family photos.

The nationwide match pairs students with residency programs around the country and is administered under the governance of the National Resident Matching Program, a nonprofit organization that helps provide an orderly and fair way to match applicants to U.S. residency positions.

Edward Hundert ’84, the Daniel D. Federman, M.D. Professor in Residence of Global Health and Social Medicine and Medical Education and dean for medical education at HMS, noted that the students had worked hard to get to this point and that the road was not likely to get easier.

“The reward for a job well done is another job,” he said at the ceremony.

Of the 161 students in the HMS class of 2015, 157 matched in clinical training programs and 4 are pursuing nonclinical positions. Slightly more than 50 percent of matching students will spend part of their training in an HMS-affiliated program.

This year, sixty-one HMS students matched in primary care specialties: forty in internal medicine, ten in pediatrics, five in obstetrics/gynecology, four in family medicine, and two in medicine/pediatrics.

One of the celebrants, Samsiya Ona, a Peabody Society member originally from Togo, matched to a joint program in obstetrics and gynecology at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Massachusetts General Hospital.

She hopes to focus on women’s health, specializing on maternal-fetal medicine, and plans to split her time between Boston and Togo.

“I have two homes now,” she said. “I can’t deny it.”  

Photo: Steve Lipofsky   

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Issue

The Adventure Issue
Spring 2015

Topics

HMS

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