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Surgery
Spring 2016

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medical education, students

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To graduating medical students, March means Match Day.

At a ceremony at HMS, more than 150 students tore open envelopes, each containing the name of the institution where she or he would continue training for the next three to seven years.

Opening the event, Nancy Oriol ’79, HMS dean for students, remarked on how students are generating a new future along with making advances in the use of technology. “During the Boston Marathon tragedy, when you were trying to find your friends and your cell phones didn’t work, you had the brilliant idea to connect with each other on social media … to account for everyone.

“I believe your creativity, your judgement, and collective action are going to usher in an amazing new era,” she said.

Match Day takes place each year on the third Friday of March as part of the National Resident Matching Program (NRMP), a system for placing medical school graduates in U.S. hospitals that incorporate training positions into their facilities.

The entire residency matching process began last fall, with students registering for the match and submitting applications to programs of interest.

In late February, students submitted their choices and ranked them based on their desired specialty, geographic location, and, for a few, their desire to be matched with their partner, known as “the couples match.”

An internationally recognized mathematical algorithm produces the final match, according to NRMP. The program first considers applicant preferences and then aligns them with each program’s preferred choices.

This year, more than 27,000 medical school seniors across the country participated in the program. As for graduating HMS students, 154 matched to clinical training programs. Nine will pursue nonclinical opportunities such as research and fellowships; some of these students will enter the match program in the future.

Fifty-three percent, or 81 students, matched at an HMS-affiliated clinical program for some part of their training, internship, or residency. Forty-one percent, or 63 students, will participate in an HMS-affiliated clinical training program for their specialty. Among specialties, the greatest percentage, 28 percent, of this year’s class matched into internal medicine.

Image: Steve Lipofsky

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Issue

Surgery
Spring 2016

Topics

medical education, students

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